Senryu : stubborn

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ganko like a rock
mom called me that, means stubborn
it’s good, won’t give up

senryu by M. Nakazato LaFreniere

25 thoughts on “Senryu : stubborn”

    1. Have to agree. When people don’t like it, they call it stubborn or hard-headed. When they do, they call it persistent or tenacious. Problem is I can be all of the above and then suddenly with new info, I can just change my mind, lol. Drives people crazy. Me too sometimes. chortling.

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    1. And I heard they never forget. When I was a kid, I took a lapidary course on base. I’ve loved rocks ever since — they look so cool when they are polished.

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      1. Has the fad of painting and leaving rocks made it your way. Mostly on FB. I don’t have FB but I found a few good ones and even left a few 😉
        https://www.thekindnessrocksproject.com/

        I’ve got one from Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Kentucky… I’ve found and left many. Though I’ll never know who got em. Just making them was fun.

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        1. I’ve heard of it but haven’t come across one yet. Unless one I saw geocaching with “Tammy” painted on it was one. It sounds fun to do.

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          1. Some states have FB pages with themes for the week. So it might have been…
            I found one in the front of a store that was sort of a cube and painted like a die. I kept that one. But I found another with a simple smiley face that I gave to my grandson. Those two were our city’s FB page. But I don’t do FB.

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              1. I first spotted them in Wisconsin. They were just placed around the town on outside store window sill, near tourist attractions (the town had an anchor displayed, even on the ground. I hadn’t know what what was going on until I met a gent who explained that his grand-daughter was hiding the rocks for him and her cousins to find. But it was part of a larger program. The idea was to get children/families out of the house. And to make art. When you found a rock you were supposed to replace it with one of your own. Rehiding or keeping what you found was your option. Some were simple others very detailed. I got a black marker and just sketched some local sites, like the lighthouse to leave around. But not having FB I don’t know who found what I created. With some exceptions. I traded with the gent for some I made and also with a little girl. It was just enough to place them around and then go and see if they were gone – for me.

                That happened quite a bit in Kentucky when I was there for about a week or so. There was a group that went around hiding rocks and had daily themes. I just picked up. traded, rehid and added my own to the mix. That’s where I found the one from TX.

                Once I got home I found the die decorated rock. So I kept one from three states now. As I gave the TX rock to my grandson.

                So yep, just spotted them. I think with better weather around the bend their may be more to find 😉

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          2. One place I visited last year had sort of a geochache with plastic tubes of odd toys. But I didn’t bother with it. Someone else who was also hunting ‘rocks’ showed them to me.
            Next time you see a painted rock look on the bottom – it might tell you where to ‘post’ it? At least where it is from
            Once when I was in Kentucky I found a rock that someone had placed from Texas. I gave that to the grands as well.

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            1. Oh that’s cool that the rocks “travel”. That happens with the geocache stuff too. I picked up one that said it was on it’s way to Colorado. I keep meaning to go closer to the freeway to hopefully find a big enough cache that someone will find it and take it up north but haven’t yet.

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              1. Do you know about http://www.bookcrossing ?
                Books sort of travel too. The idea is to keep reading fun and available and free. Kind of like the little free libraries that have popped up.

                I’m JulesPaige at bookcrossing as I sort of started out on the net there. I’m not as active as I once was. But I still have a free account.

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                1. I have heard of it. RebelGirl, another blogger, told me about it. It sounds very cool. Looks like we have a few places in Tucson so I am planning to go to one of them but forgot. Thanks for reminding me.

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                  1. I’ve taken to buying books from my Library book store. After I read them I just put them back on the shelf…. Not quite ‘free’ books. But I like helping the library.

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                    1. Me too. 95% of the books I read are from the library — I have a ton at home too but I never get to my own books because I have too many library books stacked up, lol. I just want to encourage them to keep buying physical books — I can see their budget on bookbuying has been cut quite a bit — they still get a lot of the bestsellers but they don’t buy as much midlist or newbies any more

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                    2. Time for some public donations? My library started printing on the due date tickets of how much one has saved from the books they borrowed as opposed to having had to go out and buy them.

                      I’ve donated boxes of books – even if they sell the duplicates at their fund raising book sales – I think I’m more than balance out what I borrow and buy from the library book store. 🙂

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                    3. I always considered my occasional late fees as my donation but then I found out late fees goes to the general county fund — not good. I buy books from them too. I think I should probably find out how to volunteer for the Friends of the Library. I think they do the fundraising for the library.

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                    4. At least once a year our library has a huge used book sale from all the donated books they can’t use. For years it was located at a local roller skating rink. On the third day it was fill a grocery bag or box for fifty cents. They just didn’t want to haul all the old stuff back. But some books just can’t be sold and are useless like forty year old out of date text books. Thankfully in our area there is a place that takes these books and somehow recycles them.

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                    5. I’d be there on the third day with bags and bags — I am bad that way. My books always outrun my shelves. It would be cool if the library hosted a book collage party on the 4th day so people could learn creative uses of books. Textbooks are great for that.

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                    6. I saw some use of old books where people took printed pages and accordion pleated the page, then carefully unfolded and cut out a shape, say an angel then folded it back up again in a circle so there was a 3d standing angel. Anything you can do with paper you can do with printed paper, like origami -you just have to cut the page to the correct size square you want. I’ve made paper cranes with glossy magazine adds. I think you can cut triangles and roll them tight and make beads for jewelry too.

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                    7. wow, that accordian pleated angel sounds really cool. Yeah, I used to do that as a trick when I went to restaurants in a group that included kids. I’d take the paper placemat or the napkin, rip it into a square and make them a crane. It’s the only thing I know how to do in origami but the kids would always love it.

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                    8. Isn’t it true that if you make 1,000 paper cranes your wish will be granted? 🙂 Maybe you have to send them to a particular place. I remember a sick little girl asking for help to make the paper cranes… I sent some… but that was so long ago that – well that’s all I remember.

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                    9. Yes, that’s the legend, that making 1,000 paper cranes makes your wish come true. The legend predates Sadako Sasaki but she has made the 1000 cranes a symbol for world peace. She was 2 when we dropped the nuclear bomb on Hiroshima (aug 6, 1945). She was hospitalized Feb 1955 with cancer. Her father told her the legend and she started folding the cranes with any paper she could get. Her wish was to live. Later sometimes the story is retold that she wished for world peace. She probably wanted both. She’d ask other patients if they had any paper and her schoolfriends brought her paper. A 1977 novel written about her by a Canadian author said she made 644 before passing and her friends finished the rest. In a b&w documentary, her father said the same thing and showed the 644 cranes but wiki said in the notes, the documentary needs to be identified. However, her brother said she finished making 1000 cranes by the end of August 1955 and continue to fold more than 1,400 cranes total. She passed October 1955 at age 12. Her schoolmates and friends published letters to fundraise a memorial to her and the other children who died by the bomb. Since then she has become a symbol for the desire for world peace. August 6th is celebrated in Japan as Peace Day in her honor.

                      I’ve been at peace events here in the states where we folded cranes and put them in strings of 1000. In Japan, you can see them hanging in shrines and temples. But in Japan, cranes are also a symbol of good luck and longevity–they were thought to live 1000 years. (Cranes do actually live a long time like 60 years or something. Two hundred years ago or so when human lifespans were shorter, they probably outlived them majority of humans. I wonder if that’s how the legend of them living a long time arose) Cranes are often seen on wedding kimonos and paraphenalia. Cranes mate for life and so represent wishes for a long faithful marriage. Sometimes the cranes on wedding things will be cranes painted in origami forms. So that is another representation that the giftgiver hopes the bride’s and groom’s wishes come true with the long faithful marriage wishes. I saw cranes a lot in Japan on paper and textiles.

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadako_Sasaki
                      https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1118&context=tsaconf

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                    10. Maybe the cranes I made went to a different child? I’m glad I sent them even if I didn’t get any acknowledgment back.

                      We have some great blue herons (in the of long neck birds) around our area. I have a photo I took of one standing on a rock in my creek. 🙂

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                    11. The cranes probably did. Because they are a symbol of hope, even though her story is the one that went around the world, I think there are special events where the cranes are given to children in hospitals, especially with cancer.

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